Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Busting the Top Five Myths Concerning Adoption

If you are thinking of adopting a child for yourself, or just wish to know what's true and what's not about this process, read on to find out the myths and truth about adoption below.

Myth: American babies are unusually hard to find

Reality: Well, out of the roughly 70,000 adoptions done in the U.S. annually, nearly 18,000 of them involve newborn American babies.

Myth: All children adopted from abroad are either traumatized or disabled

Reality: Adopting a healthy toddler or infant from abroad might be getting more difficult, but a majority of the children who are eligible for international adoption only have minor, special needs of correctable nature.

Myth: Adoption can take a really long time

Reality: While this is true in some aspects, there are also instances where the process is not so long. Some families have succeeded in adopting their little ones within just two years of submitting paperwork, with the process taking below a year for some.

Myth: Costs related to adoption oftentimes spiral into thousands of dollars

Reality: Adoption by average costs the same as a mid-sized car, before reimbursements and grants are included. One could in fact complete a foster adoption with only several hundred dollars in the pocket.

 Myth: Only perfect couples stand a chance of adopting American babies

Reality: Just about anyone who displays the ability to bring up children in a responsible way will be granted a child through adoption, regardless of marital status, sexual orientation, profession and ability or disability among other considerations.

For more information about adoption myths and other learning resources, visit AdoptionsFromTheHeart.com

A lot of what people believe about the adoption process is drawn from either what's been floated by the media or personal experience with adopted children while growing up. However, arming yourself with the truth about adoption as outlined above should begin stirring you up to consider adoption.

To learn more about adoptions, contact our Adoptions From The Heart offices in:

Greensburg, PA (Pittsburgh)
1225 S Main St #207
Greensburg, PA 15601
(724) 853-6533

Philadelphia, PA
30 Hampstead Cir
Wynnewood, PA 19096
(610) 642-7200

 Allentown, PA
2212 Union Blvd
Allentown, PA 18109
(610) 432-2384  

Thursday, December 22, 2016

Exploring New Jersey Adoption Laws

Countless couples struggle with trying to conceive. They get to the point where it seems like they are never going to be able to have the family of their dreams. Thankfully, there are options available to help couples fulfill their desires and have the family they want. When it comes to New Jersey adoption laws, you need to make sure you have a solid understanding of what the process entails to protect your rights.

Birth Mother

There are instances where birth mothers feel that it isn't in their best interest to try and raise the baby alone. That's when they start the adoption process on their own to make sure everything is set for when they go in and have the baby. The process can be executed 72-hours after the child is born. If the birth mother desires, she can help choose the adoptive parents.
Birth mothers can change their mind at any time during their pregnancy. However, they are liable to the potential adoptive parents for any expenses incurred that the other party paid for.

Communication With The Adoptive Parents

According to New Jersey adoption laws, there are no specifications in regards to whether the other biological parent is allowed to have contact with the adopted child. If the adoptive parents decide that they are okay with the biological parent speaking with the child, that is up to them. Technically, once the child is adopted, the biological parent has no rights to the child, including that of visitation rights. Once the biological parent has given the child up for adoption, the adoptive parents are that child's parents.
The best thing you can do when looking to adopt a child is to consult with a licensed adoption attorney. In doing so, you can make sure you know what your rights are and protect yourself. As much as you might want to rush the process along, you need to make sure things are done right to prevent issues down the road.
To learn more about adoptions, contact our Adoptions From The Heart offices in:

Greensburg, PA (Pittsburgh)
1225 S Main St #207
Greensburg, PA 15601
(724) 853-6533

Philadelphia, PA
30 Hampstead Cir
Wynnewood, PA 19096
(610) 642-7200

 Allentown, PA
2212 Union Blvd
Allentown, PA 18109
(610) 432-2384 


Wednesday, November 23, 2016

The Importance Of Observing National Adoption Month

Since President Clinton first proclaimed the month of November to be National Adoption Month back in 1995, the event has been shedding light on the role of adoption in American society. The message? All children need stable, loving families.

What Is The Month Long Agenda?


The month-long agenda of activities ranges from recognition dinners to fundraisers to community and national awareness-raising events. In 2016, the focus for National Adoption Month is on older youth waiting in foster care for permanent adoptive families. Too many young people age out of the system without ever having a stable home. They are the kind of statistic the Month was designed to address.

Those who have experienced adoption in their family, either as a foster parent, an adopted child, or as the sibling or friend to an adopted child, know just how important it is for the general public to know more about adoption issues.

How To Get The Word Out


Here are some ways you can do your part:

  • Help get the word out
  • Organizations and individuals can get guidelines to create press releases, public service announcements and other calls to action for press and media to use
  • Use Twitter, Facebook, or other social media to share the facts about adoption
  •  Raise awareness and let friends know what month it is and why
  •  A little information and positivity goes a long way towards promoting understanding and compassion
  • Listen to stories of adoption as a way of starting conversations in your own community
  •  The Children's Bureau, part of the US Department of Health and Human Services (who initiated the National Adoption Awareness program) publish a tip sheet called Talking With Older Youth About Adoption. It's free to download, as are many other digital resources including links to other national organizations that publish personal stories of adoption as a way to inform and inspire.     
To learn more about Pennsylvania adoptions, contact our Adoptions From The Heart offices in:

Greensburg, PA (Pittsburgh)
1225 S Main St #207
Greensburg, PA 15601
(724) 853-6533

Philadelphia, PA
30 Hampstead Cir
Wynnewood, PA 19096
(610) 642-7200

 Allentown, PA
2212 Union Blvd
Allentown, PA 18109
(610) 432-2384 

Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Different Types Of Support Groups For Adoptive Parents

Adoptive parents often seek community in support groups. Having a team of dedicated individuals to ask questions about parenting, spend time together sharing stories about the adoption process, and leaning on when things feel difficult is an asset. It's what many adoptive parents attribute their success to.

Reasons To Join A Support Group


If you're looking to join a support group or two as an adoptive parent, there are a few things you need to know. The first is how different many groups are from each other. Secondly, by seeing value in the resources available to you, you and your child benefit from the additional support of a loving community.

Here are some of the support groups for adoptive parents that you can choose from:
  • Advocacy Groups: This type of support group's mission is to identify issues with the child welfare system, collaborate, and rally for solutions. Members work to change policies and practices locally, statewide, and nationally.
  • Service Groups: Support groups like this aim to provide educational workshops and printed material to adoptive parents. Members fill in gaps where community services are not available.
  • Mutual Support Groups: The most common of the support groups listed, members are also parents of adopted children. They know the ins and outs of parenthood and turn to one another for guidance and moral support.
  • Frustration Venting Groups: This support group helps ease the frustration of a process or system experienced by the adopted child. It could be about homeschooling, matching, placement or even the transitioning of the child in his or her new environment. Members voice problems while others listen and find ways to meet their immediate needs.

Got A Question?


If you have questions about parenting an adopted child, you'll find a support group a valuable resource for information. Many members know what it feels like to be a newly adoptive parent, too. They can teach you the ropes, put you in touch with community programs and mental health groups that work with children, and be a listening ear whenever you need to talk through an issue or voice your concern.

To learn more about adoption, contact our Adoptions From The Heart offices in:

Greensburg, PA (Pittsburgh)
1225 S Main St #207
Greensburg, PA 15601
(724) 853-6533

Philadelphia, PA
30 Hampstead Cir
Wynnewood, PA 19096
(610) 642-7200

 Allentown, PA
2212 Union Blvd
Allentown, PA 18109
(610) 432-2384

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Understanding PA Adoption Laws

Adoption laws vary from one state to the next. However, they are starting to become more and more uniform in nature. The adoption laws in Pennsylvania allow certain adults and children to be adopted. Any unmarried adult, unmarried minor parent of the person to be adopted or married couple is eligible to adopt. According to Pennsylvania law, adoptions of children ages 12 and older require the child's consent for the adoption to take place.

 

Who Can Adopt?


Pennsylvania laws are less strict when it comes to their adoption rules about who can adopt. They don't prohibit an adult from adopting. The state is pretty open. Depending on the situation, some minors can adopt also. This tends to occur most often when they decide to adopt one of their younger siblings. Unmarried couples typically aren't eligible for adoptions in the state. For a married couple to adopt, both of the parties have to adopt. However, one spouse can give the other one permission if they choose to do so.

 

Are There Any Residency Requirements?


One of the great parts about adopting in Pennsylvania is that you don't have to worry about a lot of strict residency requirements or waiting periods. You can adopt right away on average. However, the adoption agency can ask that a temporary placement be granted before finalizing the adoption.

 

Are There Any Consent Requirements?


Most of the time, the birth parents have to give their consent for the adoption to take place. There are situations where a child can be removed from the home, which negates the parents having to give their consent. Children over 12 and adults have to give their consent as well.

Adoption laws in Pennsylvania aren't all that complicated in the area of who may or may not be adopted. This means an adult can be adopted too. There are some areas about Pennsylvania adoption laws that can be difficult to navigate and we wrote about them here. However, you do want to make sure you are in line with what the process entails. If you have any questions, you can discuss them with a licensed adoption attorney to make sure nothing is left to chance.

To learn more about Pennsylvania adoption laws, contact our Adoptions From The Heart offices in:

Greensburg, PA (Pittsburgh)
1225 S Main St #207
Greensburg, PA 15601
(724) 853-6533

Philadelphia, PA
30 Hampstead Cir
Wynnewood, PA 19096
(610) 642-7200

 Allentown, PA
2212 Union Blvd
Allentown, PA 18109
(610) 432-2384

Thursday, August 4, 2016

What You Need To Know Before Starting The Adoption Process

Many individuals dream of being able to start their own family someday. While it might be simple for some, others struggle to conceive and begin to wonder if they will ever be able to expand their family. Thankfully, there are other alternatives available for those who aren't able to conceive on their own. One of the best ways to expand your family is by looking into adoption as an option. Check out some of the key information you need to know when looking to adopt. 

Choose An Adoption Agency

One of the first things you need to do is choose an adoption agency to work with. You need someone you feel comfortable with and who is willing to walk you through the process. Don't choose just anyone. Make sure the agency is licensed in your state. Feel free to ask as many questions as you like. It's important that you know what the agency is going to do for you. 

Complete The Home Study

A worker will have to come out and do an assessment of your home situation. They are going to look for things like whether you have been convicted of child abuse, whether the home is suitable, whether you can legally afford the child and so on. All of these factors come together and help the agency determine whether you are a suitable candidate for adoption or not.

Start Searching For A Child

Once you get through the home study part of the process, you can start looking for a child who is going to work for your particular situation. Look through the list of children who are waiting for someone to give them a loving home.

On average, 135,000 children get adopted each year. If more and more people keep looking at adoption as an option, more children will get a loving home to grow up in and call their own.

To learn more about adoption, contact our Adoptions From The Heart offices in:

Greensburg, PA (Pittsburgh)
1225 S Main St #207
Greensburg, PA 15601
(724) 853-6533

Philadelphia, PA
30 Hampstead Cir
Wynnewood, PA 19096
(610) 642-7200

 Allentown, PA
2212 Union Blvd
Allentown, PA 18109
(610) 432-2384
 

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

New Bill Seeks To Change Pennsylvania Child Adoption Laws

According to Pennsylvania Rep. Scott Petri, House Bill 1526 will be extremely beneficial for couples looking to adopt if passed.

The new bill would give birth parents five days instead of thirty to revoke their consent. It would also allow potential adoptive parents to cover reasonable expenses for the birth mother and would provide much need counseling services for birth mothers who are considering adoption or who have already given their child up for adoption. 

"Pennsylvania is viewed as archaic in terms of its adoption laws." Petri has reported, "Adoptive parents are told in advance that the waiting period during which a birth parent can revoke consent is too long. This causes many to go out of state where adoption laws are more favorable."

By making changes to the law, Petri is hoping that more Pennsylvania children will be adopted.

For many, the fear of a birth parent revoking their consent leads them to seek "safer" options - either by adopting from other states or looking at overseas adoptions. This leaves many children waiting to be adopted in Pennsylvania.

In addition to this, many believe that if birth mothers and fathers are given the emotional support that they need before, during, and after giving their child up for adoption, that they would be better prepared to determine if giving their child up for adoption is the correct decision and more likely to cope with their loss after.

To learn more about Pennsylvania adoption laws, contact our Adoptions From The Heart offices in:

Greensburg, PA (Pittsburgh)
1225 S Main St #207
Greensburg, PA 15601
(724) 853-6533

Philadelphia, PA
30 Hampstead Cir
Wynnewood, PA 19096
(610) 642-7200

 Allentown, PA
2212 Union Blvd
Allentown, PA 18109
(610) 432-2384